Skip to main content youtube35 compass cog benefits world goToLastPage next previous goToFirstPage blog govtech press video copy print external twitterTheme rss facebookTheme gplusTheme linkedinTheme loading facebook linkedin share twitter download2 list grid warning search linkedin2 cell mail resources news calendar generic about training tradeshow text smallbusiness recruitment play more message download contact closeout circleUp circleRight circleLeft circleDown circleArrowRight arrowRight arrowLeft angleUp angleRight angleLeft angleDown
Blog Post

Relocatable Video Surveillance Systems Give CBP Flexibility on Border

By Tobias Naegele

Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2017

Illegal border crossings fell to their lowest level in at least five years in 2017, but after plunging through April, the numbers have risen each of the past eight months, according to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP).

 Meanwhile, the debate continues: Build a physical wall spanning from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific Ocean, add more Border Patrol agents or combine better physical barriers with technology to stop drug trafficking, smuggling and illegal immigration?

 Increasingly however, it’s clear no one solution is right for everyplace. Ron Vitiello, acting deputy commissioner at CBP, said the agency intends to expand on the existing 652 miles of walls and fencing now in place – but not necessarily extend the wall the entire length of the border.

 “We’re going to add to fill some of the gaps we didn’t get in the [previous] laydown, and then we’re going to prioritize some new wall [construction] across the border in places where we need it the most,” he said in a Jan. 12 TV interview.

 Among the needs: Relocatable-Remote Video Surveillance Systems (R-RVSS) that can be picked up and moved to where they’re needed most as border activity ebbs and flows in response to CBP’s border actions.

 CBP has successfully tested and deployed video surveillance systems to enhance situational awareness on the border and help Border Patrol agents track and respond to incursions. These RVSS systems use multiple day and night sensors mounted on poles to create an advance warning and tracking system identifying potential border-crossing activity. Officers can monitor those sensors feeds remotely and dispatch agents as needed.

 Savvy smugglers are quick to adjust when CBP installs new technologies, shifting their routes to less-monitored areas. The new, relocatable RVSS systems (R-RVSS) make it easy for CBP to respond in kind, forcing smugglers and traffickers to constantly adapt.

 Robert Gilbert, a former Border Patrol sector chief at CBP and now a senior program director for RVSS at systems integrator General Dynamics Information Technology (GDIT), says relocatable systems will empower CBP with new tools and tactics. “Over the past 20 or 30 years, DOJ then CBP has always deployed technology into the busiest areas along the border, the places with the most traffic. In reality, because of the long procurement process, we usually deployed too late as the traffic had shifted to other locations on the border. The big difference with this capability is you can pick it up and move it to meet the evolving threat. The technology can be relocated within days.”